Kansas GOP Insider (wannabe): Schools

Schools

I received a fairly irate email from a member of a public school board asking why I think public schools are the enemy. The email was in response to this post.

For what it's worth, I think the Enemy is Satan, and public schools often serve as his hand maiden. This board member went out of her way to explain that she's a Christian, and I was out of line by suggesting she is assisting the public schools in teaching kindergartners how to put condoms on bananas.

I really don't care what any parents want to teach their own children. However, I don't think I should be forced to pay more than the $13K per student per year that we're already paying so children can be taught things that are in direct opposition to my faith. If parents want to teach their own children to hate God and Christians and absolute truth, feel free. But don't ask me to pay for it, and definitely don't expect me to pay for it without saying anything about it.

So, without further ado, I will be posting the myriad of stories that I see everyday--without seeking them out, mind you-- that show why I believe public schools hate Christians. (I will skip the stories of teachers molesting students. Though I run across those stories everyday as well, I don't think those bad actors are indicative of all teachers.)

I read these stories everyday and wonder how parents can continue sending their children to public schools without qualm. 


June


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1 comment:

  1. I don't want to know why you hate public schools. I'm far more interested in finding out why you hate the 1st Amendment. It's ironic to me that you're using the freedoms the 1st Amendment provides to advocate for a position that would unconstitutionally infringe on the 1st Amendment rights of others.

    State and federal governments are not allowed to advance or inhibit religion. None of the links you provide above are examples of a school implementing a religion or a religious-based practice. Moreover, you seem to be most upset that they AREN'T implementing a faith-based viewpoint (yours), but they haven't because to do so would be unconstitutional. I bet you'd shriek to high heaven itself if some state tried to implement teachings of non-Christian faiths, so the irony here is that by not implementing *any* faith-based teaching, they're protecting *everyone's* right to worship privately how they see fit.

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